A Five-Dimensional Model of Creativity and its Assessment in Schools

Bill Lucas (2016) A Five-Dimensional Model of Creativity and its
Assessment in Schools, Applied Measurement in Education.

Abstract
Creativity is increasingly valued as an important outcome of schooling,
frequently as part of so-called “21st century skills.” This article offers a
model of creativity based on five Creative Habits of Mind (CHoM) and
trialed with teachers in England by the Centre for Real-World Learning
(CRL) at the University of Winchester. It explores the defining and tracking
of creativity’s development in school students from a perspective of formative
assessment. Two benefits are identified: (a) When teachers understand
creativity they are, consequently, more effective in cultivating it in
learners; (b) When students have a better understanding of what creativity
is, they are better able to develop and to track the development of their
own CHoM. Consequently, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and
Development has initiated a multicountry study stimulated by CRL’s
approach. In Australia work to apply CRL’s thinking on the educational
assessment of creative and critical thinking is underway.

 

Full article below:

lucas-2016-a-five-dimensional-model-of-creativity-and-its-assessment-in-schools

IOE – Social and emotional skills in childhood and their long-term effects on adult life

In this report we assess the evidence on the long-run associations between social and emotional skills in childhood and adult outcomes. We report findings from an extensive literature review, and from our own new research.
There are three key elements:
(i) A literature review of evidence relating to the relationship between social and emotional skills in childhood and adult outcomes;
(ii) New analysis of the British Cohort Study about these relationships across a wide range of outcomes, including a particular focus on the role of social and emotional skills in transmitting ‘top job’ status between parents and their children;
(iii) New, preliminary analysis of how the gaps in some of the skills assessed in (ii) are emerging in children in the UK born around the millennium.

Continue reading

The Three Dimensions of Student Achievement

This post is by Ron Berger, chief academic officer of Expeditionary Learning.

When a student is finished with school and moves into adult life, she will be judged not by her ability to perform on a test of basic skills, but by the quality of her work and character. This holds true regardless of what career or life role she chooses. Quality work and character are the keys to a successful life. So why are they not the primary focus of schools?

You may argue that schools do focus on these things. But consider this: to get passing grades, students must behave (at least much of the time) and turn in acceptable work (at least much of the time). This is a far cry from instilling in students an ethic of excellence for who they are and what they do. It is almost hard to imagine a lower bar.

Quality work and character have almost nothing to do with how students, teachers, and schools are judged in America. When is the last time you read a headline about a school being “high-achieving” that described the actual quality of work students produced or the quality of their actions? A “high-achieving” student or school means one thing today: good scores on basic skills tests in math and reading.

It’s not that basic skills in reading and math don’t matter. Of course they do. But success in this small realm is just a starting place. If students miss the opportunity to develop high standards for the complex skills they will need in life while they are still in school, how will they develop them?

Read the full article here…

Think Like an Engineer

Think Like an Engineer: Use Systematic Thinking to Solve Everyday Challenges & Unlock the
Inherent Values in The23181200m
by Mushtak Al-Atabi

Engineers conceive, design, implement, and operate (CDIO). ‘Think Like an Engineer’ presents CDIO and systematic thinking as a way to achieve the human potential. It explores how we think, feel and learn, and uses the latest brain research findings to help us unlock value and have a balanced life. The practical, easy to follow exercises given in the book can be used by individuals to improve their thinking and learning and by educators to empower their students to thrive for success.

Link to Amazon

Thomas Tallis School

The Habits of Mind blog Thomas Tallis School – http://tallishabits.tumblr.com/

“Our aim is to embed the explicit development of creative learning Habits of Mind across the curriculum to support the depth and quality of learning for our students. This blog is one way in which we will record the progress of this thinking and the development of particular approaches to learning.”