What if the further education and skills sector realised the full potential of vocational pedagogy?

By Bill Lucas

In all the recent government documents about vocational education my
favourite quotation is: “Learners must demand high quality pedagogy which
will necessitate that stronger links are built between employers, teachers and
teaching”.1 I imagine thousands of apprentices rising up from their labours
to march on the Department for Business, Innovation & Skills in London
shouting “Pedagogy! We want better pedagogy!”

In your dreams! For in the UK, despite my and my colleagues’ best
endeavours,2 ‘pedagogy’3 is a word that is rarely used by those working in
further education (FE) and skills. Instead conversation all too easily turns to
funding formulae, new kinds of institutions, reformed qualification systems,
different apprenticeship specifications and the like. All of these have value but
none is as essential as the high quality teaching and learning methods which
sit at the heart of all excellent vocational education. For it is pedagogy which
is the beating heart of the vocational body politic.

 

Read full article here:

lucas-2016-what-if-vocational-pedagogy

 

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A Five-Dimensional Model of Creativity and its Assessment in Schools

Bill Lucas (2016) A Five-Dimensional Model of Creativity and its
Assessment in Schools, Applied Measurement in Education.

Abstract
Creativity is increasingly valued as an important outcome of schooling,
frequently as part of so-called “21st century skills.” This article offers a
model of creativity based on five Creative Habits of Mind (CHoM) and
trialed with teachers in England by the Centre for Real-World Learning
(CRL) at the University of Winchester. It explores the defining and tracking
of creativity’s development in school students from a perspective of formative
assessment. Two benefits are identified: (a) When teachers understand
creativity they are, consequently, more effective in cultivating it in
learners; (b) When students have a better understanding of what creativity
is, they are better able to develop and to track the development of their
own CHoM. Consequently, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and
Development has initiated a multicountry study stimulated by CRL’s
approach. In Australia work to apply CRL’s thinking on the educational
assessment of creative and critical thinking is underway.

 

Full article below:

lucas-2016-a-five-dimensional-model-of-creativity-and-its-assessment-in-schools

Playing with Fire – Mike Fairclough

Extract taken from Foreword by Professor Bill Lucas

This book is expansive in its conception of education of the desired outcomes of a child’s school days.  It is a serious corrective to a risk-adverse world, carefully explaining why it possible to do potentially dangerous things in a character, values and skill-forming way.  It takes learning out of the classroom into the real world where it belongs without compromising the necessary disciplinary progress that students need to make – West Rise is an outstanding school for both Ofsted and for someone with my values.  It reconnects children to the natural world when too many of them have lost any link with the seed to seed cycle, with care for creatures and with the awe that landscapes like this can inspire.  It is an awesome laboratory for the development of character and capability.

Above all Playing with Fire is, for me, about trust. Trust children to set up and run an art studio.  Trust parents that they will let you take risks.  Trust teachers to let go.  Trust us all that we need help from those who understand animals and wetlands and archaeology if we are to be real lifelong learners.  Trust your luck that when the water buffalo get out, the village will understand.  Trust that there are great Ofsted inspectors who see through the ordinary.  Trust that not all health  and safety people are the problem.  And trust that, fortified by this book, you can play with fire in your own backyard.

playing-with-fire

 

Buy your own copy here