IOE – Social and emotional skills in childhood and their long-term effects on adult life

In this report we assess the evidence on the long-run associations between social and emotional skills in childhood and adult outcomes. We report findings from an extensive literature review, and from our own new research.
There are three key elements:
(i) A literature review of evidence relating to the relationship between social and emotional skills in childhood and adult outcomes;
(ii) New analysis of the British Cohort Study about these relationships across a wide range of outcomes, including a particular focus on the role of social and emotional skills in transmitting ‘top job’ status between parents and their children;
(iii) New, preliminary analysis of how the gaps in some of the skills assessed in (ii) are emerging in children in the UK born around the millennium.

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MESH guides – Supporting professional judgement with evidence from the science of learning

MESH is being built progressively through the collective effort of networks of educators based in schools, colleges, universities and other organisations, working in specialist groups using different tools. MESH operates in a similar way to that used for the production of edited books or academic journals. Funding to keep the MESHGuides available openly to all is provided by subscribing organisations, through projects and from donors.

Call for collective action: for scaling up promising small scale research

Much promising educational research is too small scale to warrant adoption across the education sector. MESH encourages educators to join together to scale up promising small scale research for example by replicating studies in different settings and by forming review groups to synthesise existing evidence (Tool 3).

Research, small scale or large scale, undertaken by teachers together under rigorous ethical and methodological conditions, can generate reliable and valid findings to add to a MESHGuide. An essential component in reporting research is that sufficient material is included to support comparisons with other studies and to allow others to build on and extend the work. The REPOSE Guidelines, were developed by experienced systematic reviewers of evidence to provide a writing framework which ensured key material is included in reports.

If you have good examples from your country please send these so we can share them with others. For example, Professor Greer Johnson and Professor Emeritus Neil Dempster at Griffith University, Queensland, Australia are  leading the synthesis of 1000 action research studies conducted by principals leading literacy in a number of contexts across Australian States and Territories. A MESHGuide summarising the outcomes should published by March 2016.

Research Aggregators such as the UK Education Evidence Portal and the Evidence Informed Policy and Practice in Education in Europe Search Portal provide useful tools for finding research which has been done before. Google Scholar and the USA What Works Clearing House are major resources providing access to existing research.

Training

In the UK, members of eedNET provide training and support in teacher researcher methodologies.

LLEAP Guide – Growing Ideas through Evidence

Expansive Education continues to develop in Australia. In this wonderful new LLEAP guide for schools, not for profits, philanthropy and business, Michelle Anderson and Emma Curtin make a powerful case for the ways in which teachers can notice the impact of their pedgaogy on learners more effectively. Their Evidence and Approaches Stimulus Tool (EAST) is a really useful practical way in which schools, with their partners, can evaluate impact. As Bill Lucas says in his Foreword: ‘Expansive educators see it as part of their job to make
evaluation a normal part of their role and it is our hope that EAST, along with the cases, make a helpful contribution to this process. Across the world we are realising the importance of using evidence in leading innovation and improvement.

LLEAP-Guide-2014

Abeerdeen University: The LOCIT process, critical incidents and learning moments

LOCIT-Diagram1

 

The LOCIT process is an inclusive approach involving teachers and their learners in constructing a shared understanding of successful learning.  The principles of the LOCIT process (Lesson Observation and Critical Incident Technique, Coyle and Wiesemes: 2008) start with an analysis of ‘lived though’ lessons by both learners and teachers, using ‘playback’ reflection and critical incident technique (CIT). For Tripp (1993:8) critical incidents are

…not ‘things’ which exist independently of an observer and are awaiting discovery like gold nuggets or desert islands, but like all data [..] are created. Incidents happen, but critical incidents are created by the way we look at a situation […..] an interpretation of the significance of an event. To take something as a critical incident is a value judgement we make, and the basis of that judgement is the significance we attach to the meaning of the incident.

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3 case studies to stimulate your own thinking and reflection about science learning in your school.

The Science Leaders Innovation Cluster in Stockport provide insight into enriching the primary science curriculum. Read 3 case studies of the impact of outdoors, responsive assessment and developing personal capabilities on children’s learning in science.

How can we encourage the development of scientific enquiry skills in primary schools?
Stockport CS All Saints.pdf

If we focus on improving personal skills in science lessons, will it improve learning outcome?
Stockport CS Orrishmore & Bradshaw.pdf

What does a responsive, child-focused planning and assessment framework for Primary Science look like?
Stockport Great Moor Infants School.pdf