School and Teacher Assessment Article Collection

From time to time the journal publishers make a selection of their most popular articles available free for a limited time, and one such collection available now is on assessment, which teachers might find interesting, and the articles are available until the end of 2015.

This is the direct link to the assessment items:

http://explore.tandfonline.com/content/ed/school-and-teacher-assessment

British Journal of Education Studies review of Expansive Education Book

Expansive education: teaching learners for the real world. By Bill Lucas, Guy Claxton9780335247554 (2)
and Ellen Spencer. Pp 240. Milton Keynes: Open University Press. 2013. £22.99 (pbk).
ISBN 978-0335247554.

Values matter in education. From its first pages, Expansive Education reminds us ‘…
education is irreducibly a moral business’ (p. 8). Martin Luther King’s advice that teachers concentrate upon ‘worthy objectives’ for education sets the tone of this book full of challenges to established educational policy dogmas. Outlining what might be involved in ‘expansive’ education, the authors are unapologetic to use the word ‘ought’ to describe the need to teach confidence enhancing and creative mindsets applicable to both personal and global contexts. Dispositions like ‘resilience and resourcefulness’ (p. 12), for example, are argued to be as vital to the mental and intellectual health of those in the ‘best’ universities as they are to the youngest children in our nurseries. Expansive education must also involve values that apply to the ‘real’ world, of rapid communication, burgeoning technologies, widening access to heritage, knowledge, skills and research. The goals, attitudes, environments and leaderships of learning need expansion suggest the writers, and few would disagree.

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Educational developers as researchers

Educational developers as researchers: the contribution of insider research to enhancing understanding of role, identity and practice by eedNET researcher Dr. Janet Hanson

Educational developers are engaged in identifying and resolving tensions in their working roles that are often portrayed as multi-faceted and ambiguous. Similar uncertainties exist when individuals undertake research as insider members of the communities that are the subject of their research. They also experience significant ambiguity around their role that has an impact both on the research process and on their own identity. This paper proposes that there is much to be learnt from this experience that may help to explain ambiguities in the educational developer’s position, both in their working roles and when undertaking their own research. In this paper, I explore my own experiences of being an educational developer and insider researcher and discuss the dilemmas that arose, with the aim of enabling others to reflect on their own positions and understand the insights, risks and opportunities presented by insider research.

A provocative think piece exploring expansive pedagogy in colleges

Pedagogic leadership – Creating cultures and practices for outstanding vocational learning

It is good to see vocational education coming centre stage in the education debate. The time is absolutely right – vocational courses are not just a ‘second chance’ default for those who have not done well in school-based academic studies. Aside from rhetoric around the ‘forgotten 50 per cent’ and the need to drive up skills in order to boost the economy, we are seeing new programmes, such as traineeships, new qualifications, such as tech levels, and new accountability measures, such as the technical baccalaureate, all with the declared intention of raising the profile and value of vocational programmes.

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SSAT: What kind of teaching for what kind of learning?

  •  What kind of teaching for what kind of learning?
    The second Redesigning Schooling pamphlet – What kind of teaching for what kind of learning? by Guy Claxton and Bill Lucas – will be arriving in SSAT member schools. Guy and Bill’s pamphlet is the second of nine editions to be published over the coming months, culminating with What the new professionalism means for the UK by Michael Fullan and Andy Hargreaves in Spring 2014.

    What kind of teaching for what kind of learning includes the following:

    • Teaching and learning to what end?
    • What kinds of learning do you need in your school to deliver your desired outcomes of education?
    • What kind of teaching will create the kind of learning that you want in your school?
    • What kind of leadership will create the desired kinds of teaching and learning, so students leave school with your desired outcomes of education?

    Download chapter 1 – teaching and learning to what end? here

    Additional copies of this pamphlet are available to members for £10 per copy, and to non-members for £15 per copy. Visit the SSAT Library to find out more.

    The following two pamphlets in the series will be Dylan Wiliam’s Principled curriculum design and Peter Chambers’ Working with stakeholders.